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2011 Singapore
Residential
INSIDE Awards 2013 - Shortlisted for 'Residential'
Singapore Design Awards 2012 - Sliver for 'Built Environment'

Pinwheel House

2011 Singapore
Residential
INSIDE Awards 2013 - Shortlisted for 'Residential'
Singapore Design Awards 2012 - Sliver for 'Built Environment'

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  • It is uncommon in Singapore to find a site that is without neighbouring plots on 3 sides, and has a panoramic view of the lush plantings on the opposite side of the road. Recognizing the potential of the site, the plan of the house is generated from a pin-wheel organization spatial concept to maximize the multiple frontages and panorama of the lush surroundings.

  • The functions of the house are contained within blocks that are distributed around the core vertical circulation in a pin-wheel manner, where every flight of stairs leads to a separate block, hence giving rise to the unique staggered form on the exterior. Open courtyards are created as a result of this planning concept.

The internal corridors are externalized, with extra large glazed panels which could be opened up for natural ventilation. The glazed windows “separate” the inside and outside spaces through transparency and reflection, along with the pockets of green scattered amongst the in-between spaces of the functional blocks that serve as continuity of the greenery from the exterior.

  • Despite the big glass windows and doors; the house is sensitive in its planning strategies in response to the tropical climate. The habitable spaces and blocks are orientated in the North-South direction, and are kept to 8m width to facilitate cross ventilation and allow natural daylighting to filter into the internal spaces.

  • Timber trellis and external timber screens are introduced, again to mediate the zones between the inside and outside spaces, making it feasible for windows to stay open for weather conditions.

  • The house has several frontages due to its multi-directionality. As its name and planning suggest, each volume and face is carefully articulated through the materiality and tectonics. Large frameless glass panels are used extensively

  • on the first storey along with some stone cladded feature walls, providing a spatial and visual connectivity with the carefully choreographed landscape pockets designed around the building mass.

The upper storey volumes are expressed as faces of the building, each frontage carries a varying articulation of the same warm timber cladding and screening, mediating the internal and external environment.